If you are in need of immediate assistance, please call a counselor for immediate help 800-839-1686. Alcohol and Drug Rehab Counselors specializing in alcohol addiction drug treatment and substance abuse issues are standing by ready to listen and address any questions or concerns that you may have. Alcoholics Resource Center is supported by caring individuals with a genuine desire to help you achieve sobriety. Alcoholics Resource Center guides individuals struggling with alcohol addiction to AA meetings and recovery that helps prevent painful relapse. We offer many resources that can help individuals identify problematic behavioral patterns and help establish the best approach to fully overcome the challenging obstacles of alcohol addiction.
The basic premise of the 12-Step model is that people can help one another achieve and maintain abstinence from the substances or behaviors to which they are addicted. They can do this through meetings in which they share their experiences with one another and support each other in the ongoing effort of maintaining abstinence. In research, as seen in a recent article from the journal Addiction Research and Theory, abstinence practices (as supported by 12-Step programs) can account for high levels of what experts call flourishing, which is positive mental health and can contribute to longer-term recovery. In the study, those who maintained abstinence were more likely to flourish in the long-term, with 40.7 percent flourishing after three months (as compared to 9.3 percent languishing) and nearly 40 percent flourishing after 12 months (compared to 12.4 percent languishing).
The World Health Organization estimates that as of 2010 there are 208 million people with alcoholism worldwide (4.1% of the population over 15 years of age).[9][10] Substance use disorders are a major public health problem facing many countries. "The most common substance of abuse/dependence in patients presenting for treatment is alcohol."[125] In the United Kingdom, the number of 'dependent drinkers' was calculated as over 2.8 million in 2001.[148] About 12% of American adults have had an alcohol dependence problem at some time in their life.[149] In the United States and Western Europe, 10 to 20 percent of men and 5 to 10 percent of women at some point in their lives will meet criteria for alcoholism.[150] Estonia had the highest death rate from alcohol in Europe in 2015 at 8.8 per 100,000 population.[151] In the United States, 30% of people admitted to hospital have a problem related to alcohol.[152]
Alcohol detoxification or 'detox' for alcoholics is an abrupt stop of alcohol drinking coupled with the substitution of drugs, such as benzodiazepines, that have similar effects to prevent alcohol withdrawal. Individuals who are only at risk of mild to moderate withdrawal symptoms can be detoxified as outpatients. Individuals at risk of a severe withdrawal syndrome as well as those who have significant or acute comorbid conditions are generally treated as inpatients. Detoxification does not actually treat alcoholism, and it is necessary to follow up detoxification with an appropriate treatment program for alcohol dependence or abuse to reduce the risk of relapse.[7] Some symptoms of alcohol withdrawal such as depressed mood and anxiety typically take weeks or months to abate while other symptoms persist longer due to persisting neuroadaptations.[65] Alcoholism has serious adverse effects on brain function; on average it takes one year of abstinence to recover from the cognitive deficits incurred by chronic alcohol abuse.[126]

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), founded in 1935, was the first twelve-step program ever created. The steps, which are very similar to ones already mentioned, were put in place at that time. In 1946, twelve traditions were created that governed how groups functioned and related to each other as membership was quickly growing. Traditions included the practice of anonymity by only using one’s first name and the tradition of “singleness of purpose.” The latter tradition meant that AA would have “but one primary purpose – to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.” As such, this precluded attendance by anyone who did not suffer from alcohol misuse and resulted in the formation of other 12 step programs.

The twelve steps of alcoholics anonymous do not come from the Oxford Groups because there were twelve apostles the  Oxford Groups practised six steps all of which AA adopted but also added six which had to do specifically with a non denominational or religious numinous power and the specific effects of alcohol addiction on the character on the afflicted.  As many addicts -- probably many more -- have been harmed by the ignorant prescription or pharmaceuticals to people in recovery for AA as have been harmed by a lay AA sponsor telling a member that all prescriptions are bad. .   


Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.
Twelve-Step programs remain a commonly recommended and used treatment modality for various types of addiction. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) in its National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services from 2013, 12-Step models are used, at least occasionally, by approximately 74 percent of treatment centers.
Origins’ treatment culture is deeply rooted in the 12-Steps which have consistently been shown to be the effective foundation for permanent sobriety in the lives of millions. A passionate emphasis on the 12-Step experience is one of several key programmatic features that sets Origins apart from the majority of treatment providers. Our patients do more than learn about the 12-Steps; they have an authentic, personal experience with them.
Many people use alcohol as a de-stressor. While some beer may be a temporarily relief from the stress of the day, ultimately alcohol is stressing you out even more. Research shows that long-term drinking can increase perceived stress in the brain. For example, a stressful situation would be handled worse by an alcoholic than by a non-alcoholic. Many other factors play into how we handle such situations, but without a doubt drinking alcohol will not help.
We AAs have never called alcoholism a disease because, technically speaking, it is not a disease entity. For example, there is no such thing as heart disease. Instead there are many separate heart ailments or combinations of them. It is something like that with alcoholism. Therefore, we did not wish to get in wrong with the medical profession by pronouncing alcoholism a disease entity. Hence, we have always called it an illness or a malady—a far safer term for us to use.[63]
But Twelve-Step Facilitation therapy is still a tried-and-true proven approach. It is far more than advising a patient to “go to AA” and providing them a list of meeting locations and times. In Twelve-Step Faciliation, the therapist actively probes and nudges, encouraging not only attendance, but participation, in meetings; it explains the potential benefits of working with a sponsor and promotes the individual developing a relationship with a sponsor; it explores problems or psychological resistances to attendance, participation, actual “working the steps,” and the development of a sponsor-sponsee relationship; and it opens the door to “AA-related activities” such as volunteer service to one’s AA “home group” or AA “clubhouse” and involvement with AA-related social events, retreats, and local and state conventions.
With treatment, about 70% of people with alcoholism are able to decrease the number of days they consume alcohol and improve their overall health status within six months. On the other hand, most individuals who have been treated for a moderate to severe alcohol-use disorder have relapsed at least once during the first year after treatment. Those individuals seem to drink less often and lower amounts after receiving treatment compared with before treatment.
Historically the name "dipsomania" was coined by German physician C. W. Hufeland in 1819 before it was superseded by "alcoholism".[160][161] That term now has a more specific meaning.[162] The term "alcoholism" was first used in 1849 by the Swedish physician Magnus Huss to describe the systematic adverse effects of alcohol.[163] Alcohol has a long history of use and misuse throughout recorded history. Biblical, Egyptian and Babylonian sources record the history of abuse and dependence on alcohol. In some ancient cultures alcohol was worshiped and in others, its abuse was condemned. Excessive alcohol misuse and drunkenness were recognized as causing social problems even thousands of years ago. However, the defining of habitual drunkenness as it was then known as and its adverse consequences were not well established medically until the 18th century. In 1647 a Greek monk named Agapios was the first to document that chronic alcohol misuse was associated with toxicity to the nervous system and body which resulted in a range of medical disorders such as seizures, paralysis, and internal bleeding. In 1920 the effects of alcohol abuse and chronic drunkenness led to the failed prohibition of alcohol in the United States, a nationwide constitutional ban on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages that remained in place until 1933. In 2005 alcohol dependence and abuse was estimated to cost the US economy approximately 220 billion dollars per year, more than cancer and obesity.[164]

The Landing is a unique and highly effective residential treatment program where adult men can receive intense personalized treatment that is focused on promoting recovery and optimizing brain health. With a unique holistic approach that incorporates the best of science-supported western medicine with centuries-old techniques of eastern healing, The Landing provides the comprehensive services that enable men to experience true healing in body, mind, and spirit. Men who choose to heal at The Landing will work in close collaboration with teams of dedicated and experienced treatment professionals, including a board-certified psychiatrist, licensed therapist, certified substance abuse counselors, marriage and family therapy interns, nurses, and clinical technicians. By focusing solely on the specific needs of men who are struggling with chemical dependency and related co-occurring disorders, The Landing is able to provide targeted treatment that helps men to focus on their recovery, set goals, and develop the tools they need in order to reinforce their recovery from alcohol, cocaine, and other substances. Gender-specific treatment enables men to discuss sensitive and personal issues that they may be hesitant to address in a mixed-gender environment. At The Landing, men can concentrate on their recovery process without worrying about social approval and the impression they may be making on others and can form an invaluable cohesive social network with other recovering men.


Alcohol inhibits the receptor for glutamate. Long-term ingestion results in the synthesis of more glutamate receptors. When alcohol is withdrawn, the central nervous system experiences increased excitability. Persons who abuse alcohol over the long term are more prone to alcohol withdrawal syndrome than persons who have been drinking for only short periods. Brain excitability caused by long-term alcohol ingestion can lead to cell death and cerebellar degeneration, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, tremors, alcoholic hallucinosis, delirium tremens, and withdrawal seizures. Opiate receptors are increased in the brains of recently abstinent alcoholic patients, and the number of receptors correlates with cravings for alcohol.

A list of best data recovery software can hardly be termed as being complete without a mention of TestDisk recovery software. It’s an open source software that was created with an aim to get back lost partitions and fix non-booting disks. Packed with features and a file recovery system that can easily overshadow that of any other data recovery software, TestDisk has a lot to offer for both novices and experts. This free data recovery program tries to detect partitions and file entries on its own. The deeper scan for deleted/damaged partitions obviously need more time.


A medical professional can work with a person attempting to detox from alcohol to help them manage cravings and other withdrawal symptoms. A doctor can also refer their patient to addiction treatment programs and therapists, so the individual can get help overcoming their alcohol abuse issues. If there are no serious withdrawal symptoms, a doctor can recommend over-the-counter remedies to manage pain or nausea. The support of friends and family can help keep the individual focused on sobriety.
Traditional addiction treatment in America is derived from multidisciplinary treatment of chronic mental disease and the peer-support program of Alcoholics Anonymous, founded in 1935 by two middle-aged men who leaned on each other for hope, and described in the eponymous book published in 1939. Its subtitle indicates it is a how-to description of the path of recovery. It describes twelve steps in the process of recovery outlined by the authors. One of the evidence-based practices of modern addiction treatment, as outlined by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices, is Twelve Step Facilitation Therapy.
No conversation about alcoholism or substance abuse recovery is complete without mentioning Alcoholics Anonymous. The group has become synonymous with the concept of addiction rehabilitation in general, and it was instrumental in changing the conversation in how people with drinking problems came to be understood and regarded. As the science and psychology of addiction evolves, the role of Alcoholics Anonymous is also changing, but it remains a cornerstone of the aftercare experience.
The support of a strong social network. In that same vein, since AA has been around for so long and is so widely instituted, its networks of support are both widespread and firmly rooted. Combined with that is the emphasis the 12-Step program places on having a sponsor to provide encouragement and motivation as well as regularly attending group meetings and finding strength through your peers.
United States courts have ruled that inmates, parolees, and probationers cannot be ordered to attend AA. Though AA itself was not deemed a religion, it was ruled that it contained enough religious components (variously described in Griffin v. Coughlin below as, inter alia, "religion", "religious activity", "religious exercise") to make coerced attendance at AA meetings a violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment of the constitution.[82][83] In 2007, the Ninth Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals stated that a parolee who was ordered to attend AA had standing to sue his parole office.[84][85]
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a global organization that was created, and is designed, to help former alcoholics through the process of learning to live their lives without the crutch of alcohol abuse. People who attend AA groups have made the decision to stop drinking and stay sober. Some of them join voluntarily; some attend as a continuation of their therapy; some are required to be there because of a court order. Whatever brings them there, the other members of the group act as a support network, explains the American Journal of Public Health; they share success stories and honest accounts of setbacks, and use this emotional connectedness to inspire and encourage each other to keep going.
Around a third of individuals with alcohol dependence resolve their alcohol consumption problems without professional intervention. Others need the support of a health professional who can recommend a range of treatments. While there are many effective treatments, people who overcome alcohol dependence often relapse (i.e. develop alcohol dependency once again).

Five stages of alcohol and substance abuse disorders have been identified. The first stage is described as having access to alcohol rather than use of alcohol. In that stage, minimizing the risk factors that make a person more vulnerable to using alcohol are an issue. The second stage of alcohol use ranges from experimentation or occasional use to regular weekly use of alcohol. This or any of the more severe stages of alcoholism may involve binge drinking. The third stage is characterized by individuals further increasing the frequency of alcohol use and/or using the substance on a regular basis. This stage may also include either buying or stealing to get alcohol. In the fourth stage of alcohol use, users have established regular alcohol consumption, have become preoccupied with getting intoxicated ("high") and have developed problems in their social, educational, vocational, or family life as a result of using the substance. The final and most serious fifth stage of alcohol use is defined by the person only feeling normal when they are using alcohol. During this stage, risk-taking behaviors like stealing, engaging in physical fights, or driving while intoxicated increase, and they become most vulnerable to having suicidal thoughts.
No conversation about alcoholism or substance abuse recovery is complete without mentioning Alcoholics Anonymous. The group has become synonymous with the concept of addiction rehabilitation in general, and it was instrumental in changing the conversation in how people with drinking problems came to be understood and regarded. As the science and psychology of addiction evolves, the role of Alcoholics Anonymous is also changing, but it remains a cornerstone of the aftercare experience.
×