The endpoint of “recovery” from addiction, if there is an endpoint, is to change one’s life for the better, to gain stability in one’s life, and to become more functional in one’s family and in one’s community. Being responsible, being reliable, being interested in others and not just in oneself, and being a loving being who cares about and is helpful to others, are all part of recovery.

This depends on the total size of all of the files that you are wanting to save. After running the Advanced Scan there may be many portions of files that have been recovered that are not really useful, but the software finds them along with the complete files that are useful. This will expand the size of the storage space needed to save the files to beyond what you thought you had on the drive being scanned. For instance, if you have a 500Gb drive that you have scanned for damaged or deleted files, the actual size of the total files found may be over 800Gb or over 1Tb. If you want to save all of the files recovered, you will need to make sure the drive you are saving to is at least 20% larger than what SRS is reporting as the total recovered file size. Or you can filter through the files found and choose only the ones that have actual file names associated with them to save so that it reduces the overall drive capacity needed for the saved files.
I agree with many of the earlier comments highlighting the drawbacks of 12-Step for many folks seeking recovery.  Although the program claims to be "spiritual" and "not religious," it's roots are in the Oxford Group, an early evangelical Protestant organization, and the 12 Steps (12, because there were 12 apostles) are taken directly from Oxford Group, which maintained that people were "powerless over sin."  Bill W. simply replaced "sin" with "alcohol" and kept the rest unchanged.
More informally than not, AA's membership has helped popularize the disease concept of alcoholism, though AA officially has had no part in the development of such postulates which had appeared as early as the late eighteenth century.[58] Though AA initially avoided the term "disease", in 1973 conference-approved literature categorically stated that "we had the disease of alcoholism."[59][better source needed] Regardless of official positions, from AA's inception most members have believed alcoholism to be a disease.[60]
We are excited by the launch of our new Alcoholics Resource Center web site and hope that each of you will share in that excitement. The purpose of this site is to provide information and social networking to support our fellow AA members. We believe that this site will meet a need for those interested in all matters related to AA within the scope of the Traditions.
Since 2014, Addiction Center has been an informational web guide for those who are struggling with substance use disorders and co-occurring behavioral and mental health disorders. All content included on Addiction Center is created by our team of researchers and journalists. of our articles are fact-based and sourced from relevant publications, government agencies and medical journals.
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