Diagnosis is aided by administering specific psychological assessments that help to indicate what aspects of a person's life may be affected by alcohol use. Determining the exact quantity of alcohol that a person drinks is less important than determining how drinking affects relationships, jobs, educational goals, and family life. Because the metabolism (how the body breaks down and processes) of alcohol varies among individuals, the quantity of alcohol consumed is not part of the criteria list for diagnosing either alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse.

When a person struggling with problem drinking or alcohol dependence decides to get help, it is important for them to consult with a doctor regarding how serious their physical condition may be. Gauging the severity of withdrawal symptoms is important, as quitting alcohol suddenly can lead to seizures, which may be deadly. Racing heart rate, high blood pressure, insomnia, vomiting and related dehydration, and fever can also be dangerous alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

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Twelve-step methods have been adapted to address a wide range of alcoholism, substance-abuse and dependency problems. Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery. Narcotics Anonymous was formed by addicts who did not relate to the specifics of alcohol dependency.[3]
There are numerous individual psychotherapeutic treatments for alcohol addiction. Relapse prevention uses methods for recognizing and amending problem behaviors. Individualized drug counseling specifically emphasizes short-term behavioral goals in an attempt to help the individual reduce or stop the use of alcohol altogether. Cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques, like helping the individual with alcohol use disorder recognize what tends to precede and follow their episodes of alcohol use, are often used to address alcohol abuse. Some treatment programs include drug testing. Twelve-step recovery programs like Alcoholics Anonymous are individualized drug-counseling methods. Motivational enhancement therapy encourages the person suffering from alcohol use disorder to increase their desire to participate in therapy. Stimulus control refers to an intervention that teaches the alcohol-use disordered person to stay away from situations that are associated with alcohol use and to replace those situations with activities that are alcohol-free and otherwise contrary to using alcohol. Urge control is an approach to changing patterns that lead to drug or alcohol use.
It’s rare for people with alcoholism to strive for that diagnosis. No one grows up wanting to struggle with alcohol for the rest of life. But alcoholism can be sneaky, creeping into life in ways that are subtle and that can pass by unnoticed. For some, alcoholism begins with peer pressure. These people just don’t intend to start drinking, and they may not begin life even enjoying alcohol, but their peers prompt and poke them to drink alcohol. In time, as they comply with these requests from peers, they lose the ability to control how and when they drink.
Twelve-step recovery programs aren’t the answer for every addict. But these principles of behavior have helped a lot of people face their addiction honestly and rebuilt their lives on a more solid, stable foundation. At Axis, our approach to recovery is based on the guidelines of the 12 steps. We use these principles as a framework for developing personalized treatment plans that address each client’s individual needs. If you’re struggling with a drug or alcohol problem, we encourage you to call our intake counselors to find out how our philosophy of care can make positive changes in your life.
Below are the statistically significant relative risks from a study by the American Cancer Society for men and women who consume 4 or more drinks daily. A drink is defined as one 12-oz beer, one 4- to 5-oz glass of wine, or one mixed drink containing 1.5 oz of spirits (80 proof). The relative risk for the noted maladies with consumption of 4 or more drinks daily is as follows:
A. I,m going to tell you a story: I was born in Newark,New Jersey in 1956,my sister was born 1953.Me an my sister were both born with asthma.my mother liked to party alot with her friends,an my father drank at work sometimes an when he got home,every day at 5pm.One day when i was 6yrs old,my sister got sick(asthma attack). I remember my grand mother trying to get my mother to take my sister to the hospital,to call my father,finally when my sister almost stopped breath she was taken to the hospital-it was to late.If my parents had of been sober my sister would be here to day,This was my first exsperiance with ALCOHOL---growing up was not easy when i was young i used to go hide when my father came home(IT WAS VERY BAD) my father used to come home from work,get drunk an start to holla at my mother if denner was not the way he liked--he would holla,yell for no reason most of the time(THIS MAN WAS EVIL)--in those days people did not care about addiction like now-he is dead thank god?
The program’s emphasis on negative feelings of powerlessness and guilt. Continuing in that train of thought, while the idea behind the 12 Steps may have been revolutionary at the time, for many they can feel outdated and even counterproductive. The 12-Step program demands that those in it break themselves down to be built back up, focusing on the notion that you are incapable of taking responsibility not just for your alcoholism but for yourself as well, that there is something wrong with you, and instilling what can feel more like shame than motivation.
If you feel as though your alcohol consumption is taking a toll on your life, it’s important to find treatment options that will help you kick you alcohol addiction to the curb. Your doctor will be able to offer professional medical assistance if you are concerned about your drinking. Seeking help for alcoholism sooner rather than later gets you back on track to living a healthy, fulfilling life.
This is another nice tool to bring your accidentally deleted files back to life. SoftPerfect File Recovery (scroll down on the page to download the program, skip the EaseUS recommendation) was primarily developed to help you rescue data that was accidentally deleted from hard disks, USB flash drives, SD and CF cards, etc. It supports popular file systems such as FAT12/16/32, NTFS, and NTFS5 with compression and encryption. The program runs under Windows XP through Windows 10.
The alcoholic's continual craving for alcohol makes abstinence -- an important goal of treatment -- extremely difficult. The condition is also complicated by denial: Alcoholics might be reluctant to admit their excess drinking either because of denial or guilt. Another barrier to receiving care is that physicians screen only about 15% of their primary care patients for alcohol disorders.

We AAs have never called alcoholism a disease because, technically speaking, it is not a disease entity. For example, there is no such thing as heart disease. Instead there are many separate heart ailments or combinations of them. It is something like that with alcoholism. Therefore, we did not wish to get in wrong with the medical profession by pronouncing alcoholism a disease entity. Hence, we have always called it an illness or a malady—a far safer term for us to use.[63]
I am surprised that along with the detailed description of the utility of CBT in aiding recovery from addictions that no mention was made of the SMART Recovery Self-Help Network. The SMART Recovery Program (Self-Management And Recovery Training) which is grounded in CBT along with several other evidence-based tools. There are about 1,500 free SMART Recovery meetings available in communities & prisons around the world. smartrecovery.org is an interactive website which receives about 120,000 unique visitors per month and has over 135,000 registrants. 30 online SMART Recovery meetings per week are available online. 160 SMART facilitators per month are being trained via an interactive online program; many are professionals. About 1/3 of regular SMART Recovery participants also attend 12-Step meetings, at least occasionally, There have been >25,000 SMART meetings in MA where 2/3 of participants are professionally referred and the majority of meetings occur in hospitals. SMART Recovery has no objection to appropriate, medically-prescribed pharmaceuticals being used in the course of recovery from an addiction.

Secular Organizations for Sobriety (SOS). SOS is presented as a secular alternative to the more spiritual 12-step addiction recovery programs (such as AA and NA) that encourage people to reach out to a higher power. The program targets substance abusers who would like to separate sobriety from spirituality and religion. The organization credits the individual for maintaining sobriety as opposed to crediting a higher power. SOS is comprised of a network of autonomous local groups that help individuals achieve and maintain sobriety. The organization has meetings in many cities across the United States. In SOS, sobriety is presented as the number one priority for individuals suffering from alcoholism or addiction. It emphasizes the use of clear communication and scientific knowledge in choosing the most rational approach to living a sober and rewarding life.
There are few medications that are considered effective in treating moderate to severe alcohol use disorder. Naltrexone (Trexan, Revia, or Vivitrol) has been found effective in managing this illness. It is the most frequently used medication in treating alcohol use disorder . It decreases the alcoholic's cravings for alcohol by blocking the body's euphoric ("high") response to it. Naltrexone is either taken by mouth on a daily basis or through monthly injections. Disulfiram (Antabuse) is prescribed for about 9% of alcoholics. It decreases the alcoholic's craving for the substance by producing a negative reaction to drinking. Acamprosate (Campral) works by decreasing cravings for alcohol in those who have stopped drinking. Ondansetron (Zofran) has been found to be effective in treating alcohol use disorder in people whose problem drinking began before they were 25 years old. None of these medications have been specifically approved to treat alcoholism in people less than 18 years of age. Baclofen (Lioresal) has been found to be a potentially effective treatment to decrease alcohol cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Some research indicates that psychiatric medications like lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) and sertraline (Zoloft) may be useful in decreasing alcohol use in people who have another mental health disorder in addition to alcohol use disorder.

"We will comprehend the word serenity and we will know peace." (Alcoholics Anonymous, p. 84)          Just For Today          Life takes on new meaning in A.A. To watch people recover, to see them help others, to watch loneliness vanish, to see a fellowship grow up about you, to have a host of friends - this is an experience not to be missed. (from the 12&12 and Alcoholics Anonymous)          
Meditation, prayer, and journaling make up Step 11 as individuals use these tools to form a spiritual connection with God or the higher power. Quiet time and solitude provide for self-reflection, and meditation can be helpful to increase the connection between the body, mind, and soul. When a person is in tune with themselves physically and emotionally, the spiritual aspect is also strengthened. Journaling during Step 11 can be a beneficial way to explore thoughts and emotions more fully as well.

You have a wealth of choices when it comes to alcohol and drug addiction treatment. Depending on your situation, the severity and type of addiction and your resources, you may opt for a residential recovery program, an outpatient one, support groups, or a combination of them. It really comes down to the person and their needs. If you or your loved one need help but are still feeling a bit lost or overwhelmed by the choices in front of you, our helpline advisors work 24/7 via our toll-free number to connect you with the best treatment. Call when you’re ready to get clean and sober – 1-888-319-2606 Who Answers? .

If someone in your family is living with an active alcohol use disorder, you and your family are not alone. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) found that more than 15 million Americans over the age of 18 were living with an alcohol use disorder and about 623,000 young people between the ages of 12 and 18 were struggling as well.
Rational Recovery (RR). This secular, non-12-step recovery program mainly utilizes Addictive Voice Recognition Techniques. The techniques enable individuals to identify and manage the "Addictive Voice"—which is defined as any thought or feeling that supports the continued use of drugs and alcohol. The program encourages individuals to make a commitment to abstinence. Unlike other addiction recovery programs, attendance of RR support groups is not considered necessary once an individual has learned the techniques.
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), the first twelve-step fellowship, was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith, known to AA members as "Bill W." and "Dr. Bob", in Akron, Ohio. In 1946 they formally established the twelve traditions to help deal with the issues of how various groups could relate and function as membership grew.[5][6] The practice of remaining anonymous (using only ones first names) when interacting with the general public was published in the first edition of the AA Big Book.[7]
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