As the name indicates, FreeUndelete is freeware tool that undeletes files from any NTFS- and FAT-based volume. FreeUndelete runs on Windows 10, 8, 7, Vista, and XP. During my test, I found the program intuitive, and the process of data scanning is pretty fast. However, what frustrated me was that the found files and folders are not well-organized, making it hard to actually select and recover those you want to recover.
Herbal treatments include milk thistle (Silybum marianum), which is thought to protect the liver against damage. Other herbs are thought to be helpful for the patient suffering through withdrawal. Some of these include lavender (Lavandula officinalis), skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), peppermint (Mentha piperita) yarrow (Achillea millefolium), and valerian (Valeriana officinalis).
At secular meetings there is generally much more acceptance of medication-assisted recovery, much less emphasis on deficits in "moral character," and no prayer.  The focus is present-centered, avoiding "war stories," and pragmatic:  "how am I staying sober today?  What tools am I using?" Participants are also generally not required to label themselves as addicts or alcoholics, which can be refreshing for many people new to recovery.  In LifeRing, "crosstalk" is a key element of meetings, so folks in recovery are sharing their strategies for success.

Several of the data recovery apps we reviewed come from companies that offer laboratory-based data recovery services—always at a high price. If you can't recover data from your drive with an app, then you can consider getting it recovered by an in-lab service. All of these services claim to recover data even from SSDs. We haven't tested these claims, but all these services won't charge you unless they actually retrieve your data, so it may be worth looking into them in case of real emergencies. Those services—Kroll, Prosoft, and Seagate—that offer mail-in recovery labs are noted in the table above, and you can read about the details of the particular offerings in the full reviews of those services.

The same survey showed that AA received 32% of its membership from other members, another 32% from treatment facilities, 30% were self-motivated to attend AA, 12% of its membership from court–ordered attendance, and only 1% of AA members decided to join based on information obtained from the Internet. People taking the survey were allowed to select multiple answers for what motivated them to join AA.[64]


Information provided is for the purpose of locating meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and to procure information about A.A. in Southern California. No other use is authorized and printing is prohibited. Groups listed in the meeting directory are not funded or managed by Los Angeles Central Office. Groups are registered at their request and listed because they are organized in alignment with the guidelines to list a meeting in our directory and they attest they receive no support from outside their group . That we list a group in our directory does not constitute or imply Los Angeles Central Office approves or endorses a group's approach to or practice of the A.A. program of recovery. Each group is autonomous, Los Angeles Central Office does not govern.
Keeping things nice and simple, EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard Free is the friendly, accessible face of recovering lost files. Fire up the program and you're presented with a screen asking which drive you would like to scan for recoverable data – you then just need to hit the Scan button. There are no options to configure, but if you know exactly where a file has gone missing from, you can specify a folder to scan to speed things up.
I disagree. The underlying premise of "recovery" is not hope, but wellness. Becoming well. Staying well. By AA's own statistics, only 10.4% of participants continue with the program after the first year. What about the 89.6% that don't continue? According to AA, they failed. It's their fault. They weren't "working" the program. Or, they're "constitutionally incapable of being honest." If one defines normality as what the vast majority of people do in a given situation, then it is "normal" for people to fail in AA.
Five stages of alcohol and substance abuse disorders have been identified. The first stage is described as having access to alcohol rather than use of alcohol. In that stage, minimizing the risk factors that make a person more vulnerable to using alcohol are an issue. The second stage of alcohol use ranges from experimentation or occasional use to regular weekly use of alcohol. This or any of the more severe stages of alcoholism may involve binge drinking. The third stage is characterized by individuals further increasing the frequency of alcohol use and/or using the substance on a regular basis. This stage may also include either buying or stealing to get alcohol. In the fourth stage of alcohol use, users have established regular alcohol consumption, have become preoccupied with getting intoxicated ("high") and have developed problems in their social, educational, vocational, or family life as a result of using the substance. The final and most serious fifth stage of alcohol use is defined by the person only feeling normal when they are using alcohol. During this stage, risk-taking behaviors like stealing, engaging in physical fights, or driving while intoxicated increase, and they become most vulnerable to having suicidal thoughts.
Twelve-step methods have been adapted to address a wide range of alcoholism, substance-abuse and dependency problems. Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery. Narcotics Anonymous was formed by addicts who did not relate to the specifics of alcohol dependency.[3]
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