Types of Files bmp, psd, jpg, png, pdf, doc, docx, xls, xlsx, mp3, wma, wav, mp4, mov, wmv...❓arw, bmp, cr2, crw, dcr, dib, dng, dsc, dt2, emf, eps, fpx, gif, ico, icon, jpeg, jpg, mrw, nef, orf, pcd, pcx, pic, png, psd, ptx, raf, raw, rw2, svg, tga, thm, tif, tiff, wbmp, wdp, webp, wmf, pdf, abw, accdb, accdt, aww, chm, cnt, dbx, djvu, doc, docm, docx, dot, dotm, dotx, epub, gdb, gp4, ind, indd, key, keynote, mdb, mht, mpd, mpp, mpt, numbers, odf, odp, ods, odt, ofxiconofx, one, onepkg, ott, oxps, pages, pmd, pot, potx, pps, ppsx, ppt, pptm, pptx, prn, prproj, pst, pub, pwi, qif, rep, rtf, sdc, sdd, sdw, shs, snp, sxc, sxd, sxi, sxw, thmx, tpl, vsd, vsdx, wlmp, wpd, wps, wri, xlb, xlc, xll, xlm, xls, xlsm, xlsx, xlt, xlw, xps, 3ga, aac, aif, aiff, amr, ape, asf, asx, cda, dvf, flac, gp5, gpx, logic, m4a, m4b, m4p, mid, midi, mp2, mp3, mus, ogg, pcm, rec, rmvb, snd, sng, uax, wav, wma, wp, xm, 264, 3g2, 3gp, asf, asx, avi, bik, dash, dvr, flv, h264, m2t, m2ts, m4v, mkv, mod, mov, mp4, mpeg, mpg, mswmm, mts, ogv, prproj, rec, rmvb, swf, tod, tp, ts, vob, webm, wmv, arw, bmp, cr2, crw, dcr, dib, dng, dsc, dt2, emf, eps, fpx, gif, ico, icon, jpeg, jpg, mrw, nef, orf, pcd, pcx, pic, png, psd, ptx, raf, raw, rw2, svg, tga, thm, tif, tiff, wbmp, wdp, webp, wmf, pdf, abw, accdb, accdt, aww, chm, cnt, dbx, djvu, doc, docm, docx, dot, dotm, dotx, epub, gdb, gp4, ind, indd, key, keynote, mdb, mht, mpd, mpp, mpt, numbers, odf, odp, ods, odt, ofxiconofx, one, onepkg, ott, oxps, pages, pmd, pot, potx, pps, ppsx, ppt, pptm, pptx, prn, prproj, pst, pub, pwi, qif, rep, rtf, sdc, sdd, sdw, shs, snp, sxc, sxd, sxi, sxw, thmx, tpl, vsd, vsdx, wlmp, wpd, wps, wri, xlb, xlc, xll, xlm, xls, xlsm, xlsx, xlt, xlw, xps, 3ga, aac, aif, aiff, amr, ape, asf, asx, cda, dvf, flac, gp5, gpx, logic, m4a, m4b, m4p, mid, midi, mp2, mp3, mus, ogg, pcm, rec, rmvb, snd, sng, uax, wav, wma, wp, xm, 264, 3g2, 3gp, asf, asx, avi, bik, dash, dvr, flv, h264, m2t, m2ts, m4v, mkv, mod, mov, mp4, mpeg, mpg, mswmm, mts, ogv, prproj, rec, rmvb, swf, tod, tp, ts, vob, webm, wmv bmp, psd, jpg, png, pdf, doc, docx, xls, xlsx, mp3, mp4, mov, wmv, bak, sys, rar, csv, exe, msi...❓arw, bmp, cr2, crw, dcr, dib, dng, dsc, dt2, emf, eps, fpx, gif, ico, icon, jpeg, jpg, mrw, nef, orf, pcd, pcx, pic, png, psd, ptx, raf, raw, rw2, svg, tga, thm, tif, tiff, wbmp, wdp, webp, wmf, pdf, abw, accdb, accdt, aww, chm, cnt, dbx, djvu, doc, docm, docx, dot, dotm, dotx, epub, gdb, gp4, ind, indd, key, keynote, mdb, mht, mpd, mpp, mpt, numbers, odf, odp, ods, odt, ofxiconofx, one, onepkg, ott, oxps, pages, pmd, pot, potx, pps, ppsx, ppt, pptm, pptx, prn, prproj, pst, pub, pwi, qif, rep, rtf, sdc, sdd, sdw, shs, snp, sxc, sxd, sxi, sxw, thmx, tpl, vsd, vsdx, wlmp, wpd, wps, wri, xlb, xlc, xll, xlm, xls, xlsm, xlsx, xlt, xlw, xps, 3ga, aac, aif, aiff, amr, ape, asf, asx, cda, dvf, flac, gp5, gpx, logic, m4a, m4b, m4p, mid, midi, mp2, mp3, mus, ogg, pcm, rec, rmvb, snd, sng, uax, wav, wma, wp, xm, 264, 3g2, 3gp, asf, asx, avi, bik, dash, dvr, flv, h264, m2t, m2ts, m4v, mkv, mod, mov, mp4, mpeg, mpg, mswmm, mts, ogv, prproj, rec, rmvb, swf, tod, tp, ts, vob, webm, wmv, txt, csv, inf, ini, c, php, tex, jsp, asp, java, ly, h, json, pl, py, rb, sh, adr, cls, cue, dif, dp, emk, hdr, jad, lyx, m3u, mem, msf, sql, pts, qgs, ram, reg, rpp, SeeNeT, slk, snz, stp, url, vbm, wpl, js, mdl, msi, bak, cgi, cpp, hpp, afl, cfg, dll, exe, lib, log, manifest, ipch, ilk, obj, pri, pri~, pro, qml, qml~, sln, suo, tmp, vcproj, vcxproj, user, user~, wixobj, wixpdb, wxs, a, bat, cab, dat, cc, aps, cer, msm, msp, pem, pfx, pli, pvk, qm, ts, qmltypes, qrc, rc, rc2, ptn, res, scl, scr, ui, use, wxl

Another important point about 12 Step programs is their cost and accessibility.  What other chronic lifelong disease has an equally accessible and cost effective (free) intervention?    Like any disease, part of our job as physicians is to recommend effective treatment which our patients can both access and afford.  I'd like for my patients to be able to access and afford all useful modalities of addiction treatment, but here at least is one they can all use.   
While both alcohol abuse and alcoholism are included in the alcohol use disorder diagnosis and involve engaging in maladaptive behaviors in the use of alcohol, abuse of this substance does not include the person having withdrawal symptoms or needing more and more amounts to achieve intoxication (tolerance) unless the person has developed alcoholism.
Once the person has safely detoxed from alcohol, a comprehensive rehabilitation program is the best step. These programs offer intensive therapy to help clients understand the root causes of their addiction and change their behaviors toward intoxicating substances. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends remaining in a rehabilitation program for 90 days, or three months.
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. It is the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider, with a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center. With 17 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas, the Foundation offers prevention and recovery solutions nationwide and across the entire continuum of care for youth and adults.
The illness of the spiritual dimension, or "spiritual malady," is considered in all twelve-step groups to be self-centeredness.[17][18] The process of working the steps is intended to replace self-centeredness with a growing moral consciousness and a willingness for self-sacrifice and unselfish constructive action.[18] In twelve-step groups, this is known as a spiritual awakening not a religious experience.[21] This should not be confused with abreaction, which produces dramatic, but ephemeral, changes.[22] In twelve-step fellowships, "spiritual awakening" is believed to develop, most frequently, slowly over a period of time.[23]
Twelve-Step Recovery addresses the psychology of the person with addiction as well as the individual’s spirituality--his/her values, his/her connectedness to others, and his/her willingness to engage with others and humbly ask for help. The process of change in Twelve-Step Recovery starts with an acceptance that when friends or loved ones point out that things are amiss in one’s life, they are likely correct, and things have likely become unmanageable. And while taking personal responsibility and accepting accountability for one’s actions are considered key steps, Twelve-Step Recovery outlines that excessive self-reliance and the firm stance that “I can get myself out of this,” and “I know what to do about this,” will be roadblocks to recovery from addiction. “Getting out of oneself” and recognizing that one doesn’t have all the answers, and humbly asking for help from another human being—from a health professional or from a lay person—are behaviors and behavioral styles that are promoted by Alcoholics Anonymous and related “Twelve-Step” programs of peer support.

Five stages of alcohol and substance abuse disorders have been identified. The first stage is described as having access to alcohol rather than use of alcohol. In that stage, minimizing the risk factors that make a person more vulnerable to using alcohol are an issue. The second stage of alcohol use ranges from experimentation or occasional use to regular weekly use of alcohol. This or any of the more severe stages of alcoholism may involve binge drinking. The third stage is characterized by individuals further increasing the frequency of alcohol use and/or using the substance on a regular basis. This stage may also include either buying or stealing to get alcohol. In the fourth stage of alcohol use, users have established regular alcohol consumption, have become preoccupied with getting intoxicated ("high") and have developed problems in their social, educational, vocational, or family life as a result of using the substance. The final and most serious fifth stage of alcohol use is defined by the person only feeling normal when they are using alcohol. During this stage, risk-taking behaviors like stealing, engaging in physical fights, or driving while intoxicated increase, and they become most vulnerable to having suicidal thoughts.

Alcohol dependence is also known as alcoholism; however, health professionals tend not to use this term because of its potential to increase stigma and discrimination of the condition. Alcohol dependency is the most common substance use disorder in Australia. Individuals who are alcohol dependent tend to prioritise drinking alcohol over other activities (including seeing friends and going to work). However, alcohol dependency is not an all or nothing condition. It occurs on a continuum ranging from mild to severe. Individuals with a mild dependence on alcohol may crave an alcoholic drink when it is not available and find it difficult to stop drinking after a couple of drinks. Individuals with severe alcohol dependence suffer physical and/or psychological withdrawal symptoms (e.g. vomiting, anxiety) when they do not consume alcohol.
Alcoholism is common, serious, and expensive. Physicians encounter alcohol-related cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, pancreatitis, and gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as intoxication and alcohol addiction, on a daily basis. Alcoholism is also associated with many cancers. Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis are also important causes of chronic disability as well as dementia. Fetal alcohol syndrome is a leading cause of mental retardation. In addition, accidents (especially automobile), depression, dementia, suicide, and homicide are important consequences of alcoholism.
AA meetings do not exclude other alcoholics, though some meetings cater to specific demographics such as gender, profession, age, sexual orientation,[44][45] or culture.[46][47] Meetings in the United States are held in a variety of languages including Armenian, English, Farsi, Finnish, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish.[48][45] While AA has pamphlets that suggest meeting formats,[49][50] groups have the autonomy to hold and conduct meetings as they wish "except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole".[4] Different cultures affect ritual aspects of meetings, but around the world "many particularities of the AA meeting format can be observed at almost any AA gathering".[51]
Definitely one of the best data recovery software out there, PhotoRec is widely acclaimed for its powerful file recovery over a wide variety of devices ranging from digital cameras to hard disks. It’s specially created to recover data like pictures, videos, documents, etc., from hard disks, CD-ROMs. Here are some of the features of PhotoRec recovery tool:
Chuck Lorre's Mom (2013-), follows dysfunctional daughter/mother duo Christy and Bonnie Plunkett, who are estranged for years while simultaneously struggling with addiction. They attempt to pull their lives and relationships together by trying to stay sober and visiting Alcoholics Anonymous. The show also explores themes of alcoholism, drug addiction and relapse.
Chronic pain conditions require a multifaceted approach to treatment. PaRC's Pain Recovery  Program addresses the bio-psycho-social factors that contribute to chronic pain. We teach patients physical, mental and behavioral techniques that assist them in living life fully and achieving pain relief and management without reliance on addictive medications.
An analysis in the United Kingdom in 2010 found that overall, alcohol was found to be the most harmful drug to the person consuming and to others. However, this study does not mean that substances other than alcohol have no harmful consequences; heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine were found to be the most harmful drugs to individuals themselves. In addition, this study did not address the issue of polydrug abuse, which is a common phenomenon in individuals abusing substances. The combination of alcohol and other substances can lead to serious adverse effects, and such combinations were not explored in this study. [12]
In 1939, Alcoholics Anonymous published its original 12-step method of recovery from alcoholism in the book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. Many programs have started as offshoots of the original Alcoholics Anonymous program. Likewise, these problems include drug addiction, compulsion, and depression.
This inventory of self is meant to be comprehensive, searching, and fearless. This does not mean that it is without fear, but that individuals are encouraged to push past their fears and be honest with listing their shortcomings. Writing lists is often an important part of Step 4 as individuals are called to cite incidents, thoughts, feelings, and past experiences that may be difficult to think about.

Michael M. Miller, MD, FASAM, FAPA, is the medical director of the Herrington Recovery Center at Rogers Memorial Hospital-Oconomowoc. He is a board-certified general psychiatrist and addiction psychiatrist. Dr. Miller has practiced addiction medicine for more than 30 years and is certified in addiction medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Miller is also an at-large director of the American Board of Addiction Medicine and The ABAM Foundation. He is a past president of ASAM.


Experience Recovery withdrawal management services are provided in a residential setting allowing clients to recover in a peaceful, home-like atmosphere. A wide range of withdrawal management services are organized within a comprehensive therapeutic environment that includes diagnostic determination, individual withdrawal management plans, psychiatric consultations if needed, medication education, individual counseling, individualized treatment planning, client advocacy, referral to community providers and discharge planning. Services are provided by licensed/certified clinicians and medical professionals. For more information Please Call (888) 988-3971.
While Wilson and Smith credited their sobriety to working with alcoholics under the auspices of the Oxford Group, a Group associate pastor sermonized against Wilson and his alcoholic Groupers for forming a "secret, ashamed sub-group" engaged in "divergent works".[19] By 1937, Wilson separated from the Oxford Group. AA Historian Ernest Kurtz described the split:[19]

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. It is the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider, with a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center. With 17 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas, the Foundation offers prevention and recovery solutions nationwide and across the entire continuum of care for youth and adults.
An alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe. Mild patterns may develop into more serious complications. Early treatment and intervention can help people with alcohol use disorder. While it’s up to the person to willingly start their sobriety journey, you can also help. Read on for some steps you can take to help your friend, family member, or loved one.
Relapse can be avoided by getting sufficient aftercare. Oftentimes, aftercare involves a peer support group, ongoing therapy, and even a maintenance medication like naltrexone, which reduces or eliminates cravings. Support from family and friends is also a very important part of sustained recovery, so finding a supportive home environment – through a sober home, moving to a new house, or clearing drugs and alcohol out of one’s existing home – is very important. Working with an evidence-based treatment program can help one gather resources about nearby or online support groups and therapists.
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What's to know about alcoholic liver disease? Alcoholic liver disease is the primary cause of chronic liver disease in the U.S. and can be fatal. It occurs as a result of chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. The first step of treatment will be to remove alcohol from the diet, but a liver transplant may also be necessary. Learn more about the disease here. Read now
In asking questions about mental health symptoms, mental health professionals are often exploring if the individual suffers from alcohol or other drug abuse or dependence disorders, as well as depression and/or manic symptoms, anxiety, hallucinations, or delusions or behavioral disorders. Physicians may provide the people they evaluate with a quiz or self-test as a screening tool for substance-use disorders. Since some of the symptoms of alcohol use disorder can also occur in other mental illnesses, the mental health screening is to determine if the individual suffers from a mood disorder or anxiety disorder, as well as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and other psychotic disorders, or personality or behavior disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
When a health care professional is caught or suspected of diversion, the nursing board, board of pharmacy, attorney general, or another regulatory agency may require admission into IPRP. This may also result in local, State or Federal investigations and charges. IPRP is required to be transparent with all participating agencies if admission is mandated, thus potentially having a much greater negative effect on the professional's career. 
Alcohol intoxication results as the amount of alcohol in your bloodstream increases. The higher the blood alcohol concentration is, the more impaired you become. Alcohol intoxication causes behavior problems and mental changes. These may include inappropriate behavior, unstable moods, impaired judgment, slurred speech, impaired attention or memory, and poor coordination. You can also have periods called "blackouts," where you don't remember events. Very high blood alcohol levels can lead to coma or even death.
Despite the criticisms and controversies, Alcoholics Anonymous remains a cultural force for treatment, rehabilitation, personal growth, and sobriety. The programs claims it has more than 2 million members globally, and reports that 33 percent of the 8,000 members in North America retained their sobriety for at least 10 years. It’s not for everyone, agrees Psych Central, but for many, it has made a life-changing difference.
Programs like AA and other 12-Step groups provide a healthy community of support and solidarity filled with individuals who are all seeking to remain sober on a long-term basis. Individuals who regularly attend AA meetings are about twice as likely to remain abstinent over those who don’t, per the Journal of Addictive Disorders. The 12 Steps can go a long way in providing individuals in recovery with the support they need.
Step 6 is about letting go of negativity and the past, and moving forward with the help of the higher power. Individuals pray, asking their higher power to remove their moral failings. People may go back to their lists of wrongdoings during Step 6 or choose to write a whole new list of specific character flaws. Individuals then choose something positive to replace these defects with. For example, lying and secrecy can be replaced with transparency and honesty. During Step 6, it may be helpful to write down several positive affirmations next to personal character issues, thus providing new and healthy methods for living in recovery.
In a closed AA meeting, the only people who may attend are those who are recovering addicts (or those interested in learning more about overcoming their addiction). Open meetings allow the attendance of friends, spouses and family members. Whether you decide to go to a closed or open meeting depends exclusively on what you’re comfortable with. Some people would rather keep their recovery separate from the rest of their life. Others thrive on the support that loved ones can provide during meetings.
PaRC's team of physicians and specialists evaluate, treat, educate and guide the chronic pain sufferer through the process of pain and addiction recovery. Two primary goals of PaRC's Pain Recovery Program are pain relief to the highest degree possible and stopping or reversing the negative impact and downward course of a patient's pain condition, lifestyle, work, interpersonal relationships and overall wellbeing. 

There are a number of secular (non-religious) self-help organizations besides SMART recovery, like LifeRing Secular Recovery and Women for Sobriety.  I serve on the Board of Directors for LifeRing.  Women for Sobriety is a women's only group that keeps its meeting times and locations private to ensure the safety of its participants, some of whom are the victims of domestic violence and stalking.


Since the 1950s, alcohol addiction has been treated as a separate addiction from that of other illicit drugs under the AA program, meaning that drug abuse disorders are considered to be a different struggle, so a separate 12-step program is recommended. Chemical dependency is considered the most life-threatening addiction disorder and addicts are advised to address this addiction first and prior to other addictions such as gambling or sexual addiction, until abstinence is established and recovery has begun. Drug dependency is sometimes considered the root addiction, causing the individual to develop other addictive tendencies and therefore should be addressed first.
Severe childhood trauma is also associated with a general increase in the risk of drug dependency.[69] Lack of peer and family support is associated with an increased risk of alcoholism developing.[69] Genetics and adolescence are associated with an increased sensitivity to the neurotoxic effects of chronic alcohol abuse. Cortical degeneration due to the neurotoxic effects increases impulsive behaviour, which may contribute to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. There is evidence that with abstinence, there is a reversal of at least some of the alcohol induced central nervous system damage.[74] The use of cannabis was associated with later problems with alcohol use.[75] Alcohol use was associated with an increased probability of later use of tobacco, cannabis, and other illegal drugs.[76]
Heavy drinking has a lot of other risks. It can lead to liver disease, pancreatitis, some forms of cancer, brain damage, serious memory loss, and high blood pressure. It also makes someone more likely to die in a car wreck or from murder or suicide. And any alcohol abuse raises the odds of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, and fetal alcohol syndrome.
In professional and research contexts, the term "alcoholism" sometimes encompasses both alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence,[97] and sometimes is considered equivalent to alcohol dependence. Talbot (1989) observes that alcoholism in the classical disease model follows a progressive course: if a person continues to drink, their condition will worsen. This will lead to harmful consequences in their life, physically, mentally, emotionally and socially.[98] Johnson (1980) explores the emotional progression of the addict’s response to alcohol. He looks at this in four phases. The first two are considered "normal" drinking and the last two are viewed as "typical" alcoholic drinking.[98] Johnson's four phases consist of:

It's interesting to read the comments, pro and con about AA and other 12 step programs. Much of which I agree with. What I did not see mentioned is that AA doesn't enter into this debate about how 'successful or effective' their program is; because they aren't selling or promoting anything. Period. AA offers a spiritually based program to help one find a connection with a higher power that many have found helpful in staying sober. Period. All this other chatter and debate is not what AA is about or even pretends to offer. This debate about the success of a program that is a voluntary offering of a chance to live sober is, frankly, ridiculous. It's truly a take it or leave it kind of deal. If the court orders you to go to AA and you feel you're rights are being violated then you might be better served taking that up with the court then blaming AA. There are three facts that are not legitimately debatable: 1) Many people have gone to AA, got sober and remain that way. 2) Many people have gone to AA and decided they didn't want to go back. 3) Addiction will kill some people who are afflicted regardless of the best efforts of the best of us.
Alcoholics may also require treatment for other psychotropic drug addictions and drug dependences. The most common dual dependence syndrome with alcohol dependence is benzodiazepine dependence, with studies showing 10–20 percent of alcohol-dependent individuals had problems of dependence and/or misuse problems of benzodiazepine drugs such as valium or clonazopam. These drugs are, like alcohol, depressants. Benzodiazepines may be used legally, if they are prescribed by doctors for anxiety problems or other mood disorders, or they may be purchased as illegal drugs. Benzodiazepine use increases cravings for alcohol and the volume of alcohol consumed by problem drinkers.[145] Benzodiazepine dependency requires careful reduction in dosage to avoid benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome and other health consequences. Dependence on other sedative-hypnotics such as zolpidem and zopiclone as well as opiates and illegal drugs is common in alcoholics. Alcohol itself is a sedative-hypnotic and is cross-tolerant with other sedative-hypnotics such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepines. Dependence upon and withdrawal from sedative-hypnotics can be medically severe and, as with alcohol withdrawal, there is a risk of psychosis or seizures if not properly managed.[146]
Various forms of group therapy or psychotherapy can be used to deal with underlying psychological issues that are related to alcohol addiction, as well as provide relapse prevention skills. The mutual-help group-counseling approach is one of the most common ways of helping alcoholics maintain sobriety.[6] Alcoholics Anonymous was one of the first organizations formed to provide mutual, nonprofessional counseling, and it is still the largest. Others include LifeRing Secular Recovery, SMART Recovery, Women For Sobriety, and Secular Organizations for Sobriety.[127] Rationing and moderation programs such as Moderation Management and DrinkWise do not mandate complete abstinence. While most alcoholics are unable to limit their drinking in this way, some return to moderate drinking. A 2002 US study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) showed that 17.7 percent of individuals diagnosed as alcohol dependent more than one year prior returned to low-risk drinking. This group, however, showed fewer initial symptoms of dependency.[128] A follow-up study, using the same subjects that were judged to be in remission in 2001–2002, examined the rates of return to problem drinking in 2004–2005. The study found abstinence from alcohol was the most stable form of remission for recovering alcoholics.[129] A long-term (60 year) follow-up of two groups of alcoholic men concluded that "return to controlled drinking rarely persisted for much more than a decade without relapse or evolution into abstinence."[130]

alcohol dependence = alcohol abuse combined with tolerance, withdrawal, and an uncontrollable drive to drink.[99] The term "alcoholism" was split into "alcohol abuse" and "alcohol dependence" in 1980's DSM-III, and in 1987's DSM-III-R behavioral symptoms were moved from "abuse" to "dependence".[100] It has been suggested that DSM-V merge alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence into a single new entry,[101] named "alcohol-use disorder".[102]

As AA chapters were increasing in number during the 1930s and 1940s, the guiding principles were gradually defined as the Twelve Traditions. A singleness of purpose emerged as Tradition Five: "Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers".[8] Consequently, drug addicts who do not suffer from the specifics of alcoholism involved in AA hoping for recovery technically are not welcome in "closed" meetings unless they have a desire to stop drinking alcohol.[9]
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