The purpose of the Central Office is to receive, distribute and follow up on calls for help, to answer inquiries about AA, to cooperate with local public information committees, maintain information about local hospitals and recovery facilities for alcoholics, to provide local AA meeting lists, to provide a newsletter, and to order, sell and distribute AA literature.  
An intervention can be held in the immediate aftermath of a terrible alcoholism consequence. Those openings are easy to find. For example, research published in Addiction suggests that people who drink before heading out on the town are 2.5 times more likely to get in a fight while out, compared to people who don’t drink. When people come home from a night of drinking with bruises and cuts, an intervention may be in order, and it may be well received.
Of the over 16 million people in the country who have a potential AUD, 9.8 million men and 5.3 million women respectively have a diagnosable AUD. About 10 percent of children in the US have at least one parent who struggles with problem drinking, and about 31 percent of driving fatalities in the US involve a drunk driver. Unfortunately, very few people every year seek treatment for AUD despite physical, mental, social, financial, and legal ramifications.
Drinking too much damages the circulation by causing consistent high blood pressure. It also causes cardiomyopathy, or drooping of the heart muscle, which reduces the ability of the heart to effectively pump blood throughout the body. Nutrient deficiency can lead to anemia. Other problems with blood can lead to clots, causing strokes or heart attacks.
Alcohol use disorder (which includes a level that's sometimes called alcoholism) is a pattern of alcohol use that involves problems controlling your drinking, being preoccupied with alcohol, continuing to use alcohol even when it causes problems, having to drink more to get the same effect, or having withdrawal symptoms when you rapidly decrease or stop drinking.
Of men aged 18–25 years, 60% binge drink. (Binge drinking is defined as 5 alcoholic drinks for men [4 for women] in a row.) Binge drinking significantly increases the risk of injury and contracting sexually transmitted diseases. Women who binge drink at this age are at higher risk of becoming pregnant and potentially harming an unborn child. (Any amount of alcohol consumption during pregnancy is risky.) Cohort data from the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME) investigated alcohol use patterns on ischemic heart disease in Northern Ireland and France. Regular and moderate alcohol use throughout the week, a typical pattern in middle-aged men in France, was associated with a lower risk of ischemic heart disease, whereas the binge drinking pattern more prevalent in Northern Ireland was associated with a higher risk of ischemic heart disease. [17]

In a closed AA meeting, the only people who may attend are those who are recovering addicts (or those interested in learning more about overcoming their addiction). Open meetings allow the attendance of friends, spouses and family members. Whether you decide to go to a closed or open meeting depends exclusively on what you’re comfortable with. Some people would rather keep their recovery separate from the rest of their life. Others thrive on the support that loved ones can provide during meetings.


Jump up ^ Littrell, Jill (2014). Understanding and Treating Alcoholism Volume I: An Empirically Based Clinician's Handbook for the Treatment of Alcoholism: Volume Ii: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Alcohol Consumption and Abuse. Hoboken: Taylor and Francis. p. 55. ISBN 9781317783145. Archived from the original on 20 July 2017. The World Health Organization defines alcoholism as any drinking which results in problems

Various forms of group therapy or psychotherapy can be used to deal with underlying psychological issues that are related to alcohol addiction, as well as provide relapse prevention skills. The mutual-help group-counseling approach is one of the most common ways of helping alcoholics maintain sobriety.[6] Alcoholics Anonymous was one of the first organizations formed to provide mutual, nonprofessional counseling, and it is still the largest. Others include LifeRing Secular Recovery, SMART Recovery, Women For Sobriety, and Secular Organizations for Sobriety.[127] Rationing and moderation programs such as Moderation Management and DrinkWise do not mandate complete abstinence. While most alcoholics are unable to limit their drinking in this way, some return to moderate drinking. A 2002 US study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) showed that 17.7 percent of individuals diagnosed as alcohol dependent more than one year prior returned to low-risk drinking. This group, however, showed fewer initial symptoms of dependency.[128] A follow-up study, using the same subjects that were judged to be in remission in 2001–2002, examined the rates of return to problem drinking in 2004–2005. The study found abstinence from alcohol was the most stable form of remission for recovering alcoholics.[129] A long-term (60 year) follow-up of two groups of alcoholic men concluded that "return to controlled drinking rarely persisted for much more than a decade without relapse or evolution into abstinence."[130]

Even if you do go to the trouble of backing up data, there’s plenty of potential for files to slip through the cracks. You may have neglected to include an important folder in the backup job, or your hard drive may fail the day before your weekly backup is due to be updated. This is where data recovery tools can save the day, and here we take a look at five of the very best free options that are available.
Jump up ^ "Corrections Catalog". Archived from the original on 12 December 2009. Retrieved 12 December 2009. The titles include: Carrying the Message into Correctional Facilities, Where Do I Go From Here?, A.A. in Prison: Inmate to Inmate, A.A. in Correctional Facilities, It Sure Beats Sitting in a Cell, Memo to an Inmate Who May be an Alcoholic, A Message to Corrections Administrators

The Oxford Group’s creed was based on four principles: all people are sinners, all sinners can be changed, confession is required for that change, and the change must also change others. One of the people Hazard spread his word to was Bill Wilson, an old friend and former drinking partner. Through Hazard, Wilson (who was struggling with his alcoholism) learned of Carl Jung’s pantheistic musings on the importance of healthy spirituality; for Wilson, that healthy spirituality manifested in the form of a desperate conversion to Christianity in an attempt to quit drinking. When this happened in 1934, Wilson attributed the victory to his faith, and specifically Hazard’s intervention. He spoke to Dr. Bob Smith, a fellow Oxford Group member and recovering alcoholic who applied the same principles to his own battle with addiction. Smith had his last drink on June 10, 1935, one month after he and Wilson started working together; today, that date is celebrated as the birth of Alcoholics Anonymous, and its founders are remembered as “Bill W.” and “Dr. Bob.”
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These are all very different drinking patterns, but they have one thing in common. People who drink like this have lost some modicum of control over their consumption. The beverages drive their behaviors. It can seem like a subtle distinction, but it’s an important one to understand, as people who don’t amend troublesome drinking behaviors can become people who have symptoms of alcoholism.
The World Health Organization examined mental disorders in primary care offices and found that alcohol dependence or harmful use was present in 6% of patients. In Britain, 1 in 3 patients in community-based primary care practices had at-risk drinking behavior. Alcoholism is more common in France than it is in Italy, despite virtually identical per capita alcohol consumption.

When alcoholism affects a spouse or partner, it’s possible to become too wrapped up in their well-being. This is called codependency. You may get to the point where you feel compelled to help your person get well. However, family members and friends often have deep emotional ties that prevent them from having the objective viewpoint necessary for treatment.
The endpoint of “recovery” from addiction, if there is an endpoint, is to change one’s life for the better, to gain stability in one’s life, and to become more functional in one’s family and in one’s community. Being responsible, being reliable, being interested in others and not just in oneself, and being a loving being who cares about and is helpful to others, are all part of recovery.

A chronic, progressive behavioral disorder characterized by a strong urge to consume ethanol and an inability to limit the amount of drinking despite adverse consequences, which may include social or occupational impairment and deterioration of physical health. Both physical dependence (withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, sweating, tremors, and delirium resulting from abstinence) and tolerance (the need to increase alcohol intake to achieve the desired effect) occur.
Recently some researchers have suggested that there are two distinct types of alcoholism. According to these researchers, type 1 alcoholism develops in adulthood, often in the early twenties. It is most often associated with the desire to relieve stress and anxiety and is not associated with any criminal or antisocial behavior. Type 2 alcoholism develops earlier, usually during the teenage years. Drinking is done primarily to get high. Type 2 alcoholism is associated with violence, destructiveness, and other criminal and antisocial behavior. Those who study alcoholism do not universally accept the distinction between these two types of alcoholism. Research continues in this area.
The risk of developing alcoholism has a definite genetic component. Studies have demonstrated that close relatives of people with alcoholism are more likely to become alcoholics themselves. This risk exists even for children adopted away from their biological families at birth and raised in a non-alcoholic adoptive family with no knowledge of their biological family's alcohol use. However, no specific gene for alcoholism has been found, and environmental factors (e.g., stress) and social factors (e.g., peer behavior) are thought to play a role in whether a person becomes alcohol dependent.
With a U.S. economy inching laboriously back from recession with a flagging job market in tow, we should be sensitive to hidden costs of this “lifestyle choice.” In a perfect world, we would weigh the right to drink excessively against the $94.2 billion in tax dollars that we spend every year to pay the costs of alcoholism. We should weigh the collective choice against the 1.9 million public school teachers we could hire with that $94.2 billion — or the million public parks that money could build for communities across the country, or the million students we could put through school. And we’d think hard about what cultural shift could moderate this “lifestyle choice” before it becomes disease.
During Step 8, people commonly resort to writing lists again, and this step is about forgiveness. Often, two lists are formed during this step: The first is a list of those who the person needs to forgive and the second is a list of those from whom they need to seek forgiveness. There will likely be crossover people on both lists. Individuals are encouraged to be honest and write down names of anyone who elicits strong emotions like resentment, shame, guilt, anger, fear, etc.
With each drink, you give away your humanity and freedom to a lie that will take from you until you have nothing left to give. Has this happened to you? If you’re reading this, you already know that alcohol is not the way. You don’t need temporary relief. You need complete healing. That’s what we do here at The Recovery Village. Call 352.771.2700 now. You don’t have to be afraid, ashamed or alone anymore.
Like individual groups, the GSO is self-supporting. AA receives proceeds from books and literature that constitute more than 50% of the income for its General Service Office.[30] In keeping with AA's Seventh Tradition, the Central Office is fully self-supporting through the sale of literature and related products, and through the voluntary donations of AA members and groups. It does not accept donations from people or organizations outside of AA.
To be diagnosed with AUD, individuals must meet certain criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Under DSM–5, the current version of the DSM, anyone meeting any two of the 11 criteria during the same 12-month period receives a diagnosis of AUD. The severity of AUD—mild, moderate, or severe—is based on the number of criteria met.

Information provided is for the purpose of locating meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and to procure information about A.A. in Southern California. No other use is authorized and printing is prohibited. Groups listed in the meeting directory are not funded or managed by Los Angeles Central Office. Groups are registered at their request and listed because they are organized in alignment with the guidelines to list a meeting in our directory and they attest they receive no support from outside their group . That we list a group in our directory does not constitute or imply Los Angeles Central Office approves or endorses a group's approach to or practice of the A.A. program of recovery. Each group is autonomous, Los Angeles Central Office does not govern.


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I agree with many of the earlier comments highlighting the drawbacks of 12-Step for many folks seeking recovery.  Although the program claims to be "spiritual" and "not religious," it's roots are in the Oxford Group, an early evangelical Protestant organization, and the 12 Steps (12, because there were 12 apostles) are taken directly from Oxford Group, which maintained that people were "powerless over sin."  Bill W. simply replaced "sin" with "alcohol" and kept the rest unchanged.
The co-occurrence of major depressive disorder and alcoholism is well documented.[47][48][49] Among those with comorbid occurrences, a distinction is commonly made between depressive episodes that remit with alcohol abstinence ("substance-induced"), and depressive episodes that are primary and do not remit with abstinence ("independent" episodes).[50][51][52] Additional use of other drugs may increase the risk of depression.[53] Psychiatric disorders differ depending on gender. Women who have alcohol-use disorders often have a co-occurring psychiatric diagnosis such as major depression, anxiety, panic disorder, bulimia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or borderline personality disorder. Men with alcohol-use disorders more often have a co-occurring diagnosis of narcissistic or antisocial personality disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, impulse disorders or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).[54] Women with alcoholism are more likely to experience physical or sexual assault, abuse and domestic violence than women in the general population,[54] which can lead to higher instances of psychiatric disorders and greater dependence on alcohol.

Topiramate, a derivative of the naturally occurring sugar monosaccharide D-fructose, has been found effective in helping alcoholics quit or cut back on the amount they drink. Evidence suggests that topiramate antagonizes excitatory glutamate receptors, inhibits dopamine release, and enhances inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid function. A 2008 review of the effectiveness of topiramate concluded that the results of published trials are promising, however, as of 2008, data was insufficient to support using topiramate in conjunction with brief weekly compliance counseling as a first-line agent for alcohol dependence.[177] A 2010 review found that topiramate may be superior to existing alcohol pharmacotherapeutic options. Topiramate effectively reduces craving and alcohol withdrawal severity as well as improving quality-of-life-ratings.[178]
Another variation comes from the fact that some people are uncomfortable with the specific, religious aspects of the 12-Step program. As stated above, and as evident by the steps themselves, the 12-Step model originated from a Christian point of view. Those who are not Christian have modified the steps to refer to their specific religious or spiritual practice as a way to connect more with the structure of the 12-Step program. In addition, a number of non-religious 12-Step groups have modified the steps to fit a secular model that can help those who are agnostic or atheist practice the program without feeling forced to adhere to a religion they don’t believe in.

Detoxification begins 4–6 hours after the last consumption of alcohol and lasts for 5–7 days. In this period, diazepam is administered every six hours to control the detoxification process and withdrawal symptoms. While detoxification often occurs in hospitals, some people undergo detoxification in their homes. However, patients should not consider undergoing detoxification at home if they have suicidal feelings, do not have friends and family to support them, or have experienced severe withdrawal symptoms before.
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. It is the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider, with a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center. With 17 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas, the Foundation offers prevention and recovery solutions nationwide and across the entire continuum of care for youth and adults.

At Origins, our goal is seamlessly integrate cutting-edge, evidence-based medical and clinical services within the timeless 12-Step model. We understand that quality treatment addresses all aspects of the person, including the spiritual components of wellness. The 12-Steps are a spiritual program of action that can change our perceptions, and bring new purpose into our lives. By connecting with a deeper sense of meaning, those of us in recovery are able to positively impact the lives of those around us.


Twelve-Step programs remain a commonly recommended and used treatment modality for various types of addiction. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) in its National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services from 2013, 12-Step models are used, at least occasionally, by approximately 74 percent of treatment centers.


If you feel as though your alcohol consumption is taking a toll on your life, it’s important to find treatment options that will help you kick you alcohol addiction to the curb. Your doctor will be able to offer professional medical assistance if you are concerned about your drinking. Seeking help for alcoholism sooner rather than later gets you back on track to living a healthy, fulfilling life.
The immediate physical effects of drinking alcohol range from mild mood changes to complete loss of coordination, vision, balance, and speech -- any of which can be signals of acute alcohol intoxication, or drunkenness. These effects usually wear off in a matter of hours after a person stops drinking. Many law-enforcement agencies regard a .08 percentage of alcohol in the bloodstream as evidence of intoxication. Larger amounts of blood alcohol can impair brain function and eventually cause unconsciousness. An extreme overdose, alcohol poisoning, can be fatal.
Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. AA is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.
Our program focuses on the whole child, with the ultimate goals of abstinence, improved mental health and better family relationships. Our intensive outpatient program (IOP) is the only one in North Texas that offers this level of care specifically for teens. We incorporate medication management, cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational enhancement therapy, group and individual therapy, and family engagement to help your child gain valuable coping skills to end drug abuse, as well as manage emotional or psychological problems.
These are all very different drinking patterns, but they have one thing in common. People who drink like this have lost some modicum of control over their consumption. The beverages drive their behaviors. It can seem like a subtle distinction, but it’s an important one to understand, as people who don’t amend troublesome drinking behaviors can become people who have symptoms of alcoholism.
Michael, while one of the above posters felt that the anti-medication bias of many AA members (as well as its entire leadership) is receding, I have not seen that at all. Patients on methadone, buprenorphine and even (very recently) Vivitrol, are told that they are not "clean," cannot speak at the meeting, cannot receive sobriety tokens, cannot join in on committments and in fact are still using.  They are urged routinely to stop their medications.  While it has perhaps receded with some psychiatric medications, it has NOT with many other medications, including Disulfiram, Campral and Naltrexone.

In 1941, interviews on American radio and favorable articles in US magazines, including a piece by Jack Alexander in The Saturday Evening Post, led to increased book sales and membership.[23] By 1946, as the growing fellowship quarreled over structure, purpose, and authority, as well as finances and publicity, Wilson began to form and promote what became known as AA's "Twelve Traditions," which are guidelines for an altruistic, unaffiliated, non-coercive, and non-hierarchical structure that limited AA's purpose to only helping alcoholics on a non-professional level while shunning publicity. Eventually he gained formal adoption and inclusion of the Twelve Traditions in all future editions of the Big Book.[4] At the 1955 conference in St. Louis, Missouri, Wilson relinquished stewardship of AA to the General Service Conference,[24] as AA grew to millions of members internationally.[25]
Whether you need help getting rid of an addiction or live with a teenager who does, our phone line is ready to take your call, around the clock, and is manned by friendly advisors, there to discuss the best-quality inpatient prescription and street drug recovery centers Cheyenne, Wyoming offers. You can review the specifics of one month addiction recovery clinics versus sixty or ninety day ones and make sure the treatment clinic you decide on is going to give you or your family member everything you need to triumph over addiction.
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The term alcoholism is commonly used amongst laypeople, but the word is poorly defined. The WHO calls alcoholism "a term of long-standing use and variable meaning", and use of the term was disfavored by a 1979 WHO expert committee. The Big Book (from Alcoholics Anonymous) states that once a person is an alcoholic, they are always an alcoholic, but does not define what is meant by the term alcoholic in this context. In 1960, Bill W., co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), said:
Schuckit, M. A., Smith, T. L., Danko, G. P., Trim, R., Bucholz, K. K., Edenberg, H. J., ... & Dick, D. M. (2009, May). An evaluation of the full level of response to alcohol model of heavy drinking and problems in COGA offspring. Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, 70(3), 436-445. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2670749/
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), founded in 1935, was the first twelve-step program ever created. The steps, which are very similar to ones already mentioned, were put in place at that time. In 1946, twelve traditions were created that governed how groups functioned and related to each other as membership was quickly growing. Traditions included the practice of anonymity by only using one’s first name and the tradition of “singleness of purpose.” The latter tradition meant that AA would have “but one primary purpose – to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.” As such, this precluded attendance by anyone who did not suffer from alcohol misuse and resulted in the formation of other 12 step programs.
AA is the most widely available 12-Step program, and meeting times and locations are easily found on the Internet. Our Continuum of Care staff provides recommendations for solution-based meetings with a solid foundation of support. At Origins Behavioral HealthCare, we familiarize our patients with 12-Step meetings during their stay and connect them with 12-Step resources in their own communities.
Around a third of individuals with alcohol dependence resolve their alcohol consumption problems without professional intervention. Others need the support of a health professional who can recommend a range of treatments. While there are many effective treatments, people who overcome alcohol dependence often relapse (i.e. develop alcohol dependency once again).
Steps one through three deal with the individual’s acceptance of their inability to control their addiction alone and the need of support to remain abstinent. Steps four through nine teach the individual to take responsibility for their own actions and characteristics in order to create change in their life. Steps four, six and eight require self-reflection while steps five, seven and nine are the application of those reflections. The focus in steps 10 through 12 is on maintaining recovery. Each step builds upon the previous step in a progressive course of action.
When an individual has been struggling through an addiction, it is usually not simply the substance abuser who needs support. Family members' lives are often closely connected with, and deeply affected by, the loved one who has been abusing a substance. Thankfully, there are also support groups to help carry these loved ones through the difficult times and questions that may arise in these circumstances.
Humility is the key of Step 7, as individuals are asked to seek God’s will in how their life is to be lived. Humility is defined as the state of being humble or thinking less of oneself than of others. Humility is an important concept in recovery. Meditation is often useful during Step 7 as a method of self-introspection and learning how to apply humility to one’s life. During Step 7, individuals work to remain humble.
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